Agricultural cycles

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Part of Mr Badley’s genius (I muse, taking an early morning stroll as a proper, warm June summer’s day takes shape) was to twig how close we humans are to the seasonal cycles of the agricultural year.  After all, a Western European is only a maximum of a mere ten generations or so away from living on the land and being bound by the cycles of sowing, growth and harvest.

In Mr Badley’s case, there were additional specific reasons why having a school within a farm made sense: what greater emblem could there be of Work of Each for Weal of All than communal haymaking? And of course he wanted his students to “know a hawk from a hernshaw” and to avoid a situation where “the rotation of the crops [is] as much a mystery as the procession of the Equinoxes”. This was partly to avoid the helplessness that he saw as resulting from young gentlemen who expected “to be at one end of a bell-pull with a servant at the other.”

Alongside this was his conviction that the education of head, hand and heart needed to work in conjunction- agricultural hand work (which was innately “useful work”) was, alongside archery, drawing and woodwork, a vital part of this educational elixir.

Here we stand at the start of June and the educational cycle is about to go through one of its seasonal turns, with an additional twist this year: the Block 3s are coming towards the end of the first cycle of a curriculum which we re-shaped and introduced in September last year.  Central to this re-jigged programme was a much greater commitment to Outdoor Work and in particular the growing of food. We wanted these young men and women to learn more about the countryside that they are part of; so they have been growing vegetables and raising pigs.

This week the first of the Block 3 tutor groups will host their parents to a meal which features their handy work. They will also tell their parents about their individual and group projects, many of which are based in the land that surrounds us. Of course, we will be eliciting feedback from this first group of students and ensuring that next year’s cohort benefit from the refinements we will introduce as a result, but the initial indications are good and it is heartening to see this vital element of Bedales life having such a positive impact on young lives.

In the meantime, along with some new facilities for next year’s piglets – luxurious sties being built as an Outdoor Work Bedales Assessed Course project- 30 handsome hens have occupied their new home, the aptly named Jurassic Park hen enclosure, perhaps the best fortified such encampment in Hampshire.