Evening at Chalk Farm

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By Keith Budge, Headmaster, Bedales Schools

Last time I was at the Round House, I was watching Bob Hoskins in all the pomp of his stage villainy plot the downfall of the Duchess of Malfi.  Tuesday evening and I am sitting at a fancy table, well dined, in a Round House adapted for the RIBA awards, surrounded by architects, listening to Louise Minchin describe the four buildings that are shortlisted for Client of the Year: Bedales School Art & Design Building being one of them.  The judge opens his envelope and – wow! – Yes, we have won.

Up onto the stage we go for the presentation of the award and my brief, sob-free, acceptance speech.  Big thanks are due to Tom Jarman of Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios who nominated us for the award and to the home team: Matthew Rice whose vision for the building informed the project;  our bursar, Richard Lushington, who held all the different dimensions together; Nigel Hartley, the project manager; and the heads of Art and Design, Simon Sharp and Ben Shaw.

Cameras flash etc and we troop off to leave the stage free for the Stirling Prize – Hastings Pier, which is firmly on my list of places to visit.

The RIBA Client of the Year has been awarded since 1998 and we are the first school to win the prize – you can see the previous winners here.

So, this is good for Bedales, for the independent sector and for schools in general.  Building well, works – great design and a great process is often no more expensive than the grimly utilitarian. And you have a building that will inspire for a century or so.

For me, there are three major lessons that come from the Client of the Year accolade.

The first is the power of ethos.  The RIBA booklet describes it as “a building after a philosophy of being”. In the same way that we have tried to ensure that the ethos permeates the curriculum, so the best of our buildings embody the ethos.  Appreciation of the beautiful, making and doing and the influence of the school environment are all key elements of that ethos which the building reflects.

The second is the power of consultation: students, staff, parents, OBs, the local community were all consulted.  The initial plans were rejected – “too big, too dark, too close to Steephurst” – and the revised ones then consulted on further.

Finally, it is the strength of collaboration. RIBA described is as “co-authorship in the truest sense”.  Architects and school understood, liked and respected each other, with a brilliant result.  Hoorah!

Celebrating The Chief’s 150th Birthday

Gemma Klein Photography

1865 saw the births of two men, W.B.Yeats and John Badley, whose lives affected how people feel and think now: Yeats as one of the most influential poets in the English Modernist movement; Badley as an educator whose vision of how our education system could be made humane created a school which has influenced many others. Although Badley could turn a passable piece of verse and no doubt a school set up by Yeats would have been entertaining for a few weeks (quite a lot of marching, sometimes in a nice brown shirt and a lot of learning about bizarre mythologies), I am glad that their respective vocational bias followed the courses they did. Yeats’ politics and his personal beliefs (think gyres and Rosicrucianism) were at best just odd, but often unpalatable, but his poetry was sublime and even visionary (think, Second Coming).

John Badley, aka The Chief, had his 150th birthday in half term (21st) and so yesterday, as soon as we could, we celebrated it by doing something I trust he would have approved of: cakes were baked, including a specially gorgeous multi-layered and beautifully ornamented birthday cake (made by colleague Diana Robinson, Dunhurst Matron) and we cut the ground for the new Art & Design building. In this respect the spade work was done by eight young men and women from across the schools – four Block 4s, two Dunhurstians and two Dunannie pupils (whose hard hats stubbornly wouldn’t stay on). They had the tough manual work; I merely had to sit in a (rather wonderful) machine and take some simple instructions. Here are some photos which give you a flavour. Many thanks to the patient men from our contractors, Beard. The good-humoured group of supporters who had witnessed the new building’s start disappeared into the February gloaming, with Chairman Matthew Rice’s suitably practical words, “See you again in 18 months’ time when we open!”

Gemma Klein Photography Gemma Klein Photography Gemma Klein Photography Gemma Klein Photography


Bedales School is one of the UK’s top independent private co-education boarding schools. Bedales comprises three schools situated in Steep, near Petersfield, Hampshire: Dunannie (ages 3–8), Dunhurst (ages 8–13) and Bedales itself (ages 13–18). Established in 1893 Bedales School puts emphasis on the Arts, Sciences, voluntary service, pastoral care, and listening to students’ views. Bedales is acclaimed for its drama, theatre, art and music. The Headmaster is Keith Budge.