May ideas swim

Mizzling is the word, I think, for the gentle rain that greets me and my fellow Poetry Society breakfasters as we gather by Steephurst, ready to head up to the Poet’s Stone for our annual May breakfast.  The celebrants all bring poems and we have a good range:  plenty of Edward Thomas of course, some Shelley, Browning and a jewel of a Robin Robertson poem, Swimming in the Woods, which I read and I can’t resist copying in below.

The rain stops; early sun lights up Steep woods, which we admire from our vantage point on the Hangers’ flank by Thomas’ sarsen stone.  Magical stuff.

The week’s big external facing event has been our Liberating Leaders conference which we ran in partnership with the Times Educational Supplement and King Edward VI School Bury St Edmunds.  Most conferences have at least one soggy item; I could not spot one in our line-up.  So, here are some very personal highlights.

Sir Michael Wilshaw (Chief Inspector of Education, Children’s Services and Skills) reminiscing in a finely wrought speech about the maverick headteachers who had shaped his professional life and the need for schools to enable the best characteristics of the maverick to inform teachers’ work.  Look out for the cross backlash from educators who feel that this is a bit ripe given his time at Ofsted.

Danielle Harlan (Founder and CEO of the Centre for Advancing Leadership and Human Potential) on authenticity as a leader, employee engagement (which is – sad fact – stuck at 13% worldwide) and unleashing creativity.  An extraordinarily lucid but profound presentation that was in itself a masterclass in clear and memorable communication. New verb alert – to “geek out” over someone = state of admiration and adulation of a senior, august academic figure by a scholarly acolyte/admirer.

Barbara Oakley (Professor of Engineering at Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan) on re-making  your brain and lessons learnt from her creation and co-teaching of the world’s most popular (1.5 million students) Massive Open Online Course (MOOC).  She is very keen that Bedales launches a MOOC – we will explore this.  An account – as scholarly as it was homely – of her distinctive path, her own learning and some of the ways in which we can improve our learning. Key tip: buy a Pomodoro (tomato shaped timer) or set one up as an app and work in 25 minute chunks; give yourself rewards after each 25 minutes; sleep and exercise aplenty.  That classy organ, the brain, loves these rhythms.  Get it right and, like Barbara, you start with Russian and end up a leading Professor of Engineering – and meet your future life partner at the South Pole.

Happily for our students, a number of them were able to attend the conference.  Most will have heard Danielle’s assembly on Monday and many also heard Barbara talk about girls and STEM subjects. You can view the speakers’ presentations here.

In all, the many of us who heard these inspiring people can justly feel lucky ducks (as they say in Lancashire).

So here is that poem: enjoy the half term break, and maybe some wild swimming.

Swimming in the Woods by Robin Robertson 

Her long body in the spangled shade of the wood
was a swimmer moving through a pool:
fractal, finned by leaf and light;
the loose plates of lozenge and rhombus
wobbling coins of sunlight.
When she stopped, the water stopped,
and the sun remade her as a tree,
banded and freckled and foxed.

Besieged by symmetries, condemned
to these patterns of love and loss,
I stare at the wet shape on the tiles
till it fades; when she came and sat next to me
after her swim and walked away
back to the trees, she left a dark butterfly.

 

 

 

 

School and The Future

How much should schools be refuges from the realities of the adult world?  To what extent should we alert our students to the challenges they will face in adult life?

Starting here in the early noughties, I felt that Bedales offered too much of a warm bath of reassurance – too impermeable a bubble.  A formative early experience was the outrage I faced from students when telling a 6.1 cohort that they weren’t working hard enough and that it was simply no good for them to compare themselves with their contemporary here, but they needed to think about the person they were competing against, who was at Manchester Grammar, King’s Canterbury or a high performing sixth form college.  I was roundly told that they regarded their school as somewhere that needed to keep that world at one remove – I had no right to be trying to frighten them into action like this.

Things have changed – within the school and outside it.  The zeitgeist out there is different, now we realise that the la-la land of continuously rising living standards and secure-ish jobs is no longer a fixture.

I gave an assembly last night which looked at the speed and extent of automation – the fourth industrial revolution that the World Economic Forum is telling us about – in the light of humankind’s striving for the ideal; so there is Utopia, Brave New World and, almost contemporaneously, G.M. Keynes’ famous essay, Economic Possibilities for our Grandchildren where he envisages the world of 2030 where the leisure which “science and compound interest” have won for the imaginary grandson will enable him “to live wisely and agreeably and well.”  In Keynes’ high-minded view, it is not just that we will have enough money not to need to work for much of the time, but that we will have moved beyond money – that’s another topic, albeit an intriguing one.

I then paid court to Moore’s Law and the likely impact on middle class jobs that this speedy wave of automation will bring – using one of my favourite pieces of holiday reading, Martin Ford’s Rise of the Robots; but what I was most interested in sketching out was what schools need to do to prepare their students for this rapidly changing world.

So, this was my list:

  • Cross-disciplinary thinking – working across subject disciplines, especially Science and Humanities.
  • Collaboration – interconnectedness will put this at a premium. The place of the lone scholar with his quill is limited.
  • Communication – hand in glove with what’s above and below.
  • Empathy and respect for people from different backgrounds and cultures.
  • Love of learning and with it an appetite for life-long learning.

Although I think we do a lot of this quite well, there is more that we can and should do.  I am sure that our independent-minded students will happily join the debate.

 

Creativity in China

On a British Council-sponsored visit to China, representing UK boarding and, via that, Bedales; so as I tap this it is early morning and I am sitting with my four headteacher colleagues  in the mother of all traffic jams in Dalian, up north on the coast (known in colonial times as Port Arthur) and, like most Chinese cities, a place of huge growth. Now it stands at about 6 million.  Most of our work us in and around Beijing but this is our excursion north to take our message to this increasingly affluent city.

Having spent some of my sabbatical in China in 2009, when Moony and I visited our partner school in Shanghai (Chuanshua) and then travelled more broadly, it is intriguing to see how things have shot on in the interim, not least in approaches to education. Yesterday we spent much of the day at Beijing No 80 High School. Situated in the Chaoyang district of Beijing and selected in 2010 as “an experimental school for the cultivation of innovative talents in Beijing”, it says much about the ambition of Chinese education. Using its international section as a way of making the school look outwards, it is throwing huge resources at teacher training and student exchanges. For example 300 teachers spent a month training in England this summer. The most intriguing part if the three hour conference we had there with local educators yesterday was the contribution of the boss of the Education Committee of the Chaoyang  district, which (to give you a sense of the scale) has 5 million people in it.  What became very clear is that the government is seeking to meet the growing appetite amongst the Chinese middle classes for a better global perspective through getting more of the educational world to come to it.  Also clear is the way in which schools like No 80 are taking seriously the need to make students think for themselves: expressions like lifelong learning and creative thinking abound.

All this is part of the Chinese “2020 plan”, set out in 2010, to prepare their students to compete better internationally  and for more to have the option of going to top foreign universities.  In recognition of the important work No 80 is doing, not only did they have us to visit, but also Premier Hu Jintao visited last year.

Even more enjoyable than the three hour conference or even the bewitching array of lunchtime dishes, was teaching an Edward Thomas poem (The Manor Farm) to a very orderly group of sixth formers.  The 35 students were very patient and receptive. We concluded with a shot of the memorial inscription about Thomas (“killed Arras…1917”) from the Poet’s Stone, which elicited a general, plaintive sigh – an endearing and memorable final moment.

Keith Budge, Headmaster, Bedales Schools


Bedales School is one of the UK’s top independent private co-education boarding schools. Bedales comprises three schools situated in Steep, near Petersfield, Hampshire: Dunannie (ages 3–8), Dunhurst (ages 8–13) and Bedales itself (ages 13–18). Established in 1893 Bedales School puts emphasis on the Arts, Sciences, voluntary service, pastoral care, and listening to students’ views. Bedales is acclaimed for its drama, theatre, art and music. The Headmaster is Keith Budge.

Sports Pavilion shingling day

Sunday is shingling day as the almost-finished roof of the Sam Banks Pavilion resounds with the tap of hammers: most roofs aren’t made of wood, but this one is – of Red Cedar shingles, which need to be carefully fixed in place so that they overlap cunningly. Not only do they look, feel and smell nice, but they are very practical, lasting up to 40 years. The weekend is billed as one members of the community, current and past, can come and lend a hand; so there is a good social buzz as we clamber over this beautiful looking and fragrant roof that rests gracefully on its Douglas fir and oak frame. For those of us who are deeply cack-handed but doggedly determined, it’s the kind of job we like: sufficiently manageable so we can get it done but with just enough skill to make us feel that we are, well, skilled. OBs John Russell and Gabriel Langlands are there to guide us, with admirable patience. Planes and knives are deployed to ensure that the shingles fit and don’t go wonky. I like being perched up there on the roof, looking out to one side over the astroturf  at Fairhaven, where John Badley spent his final years; and to the other side at the Cricket Pavilion, built primarily by students in the early 1900s and used as a rallying cry to shake students into action  (“the spirit that built the Pav…”).   The day finishes with the final shingle hammered in by Graham Banks and a celebratory toast.  Much remains to be done at ground level but the roof looks stunning and it is satisfying to know it will be more or less weatherproof now. On the way home, drawn in by the pulsating melody coming from the theatre, I find an equally committed gang of students, marshalled by supremo Neil Hornsby.  Work started at 9 on Sunday morning (and go on till 9 in the evening) shaping this week’s annual school Rock Show. On Thursday and Friday and already sold out, It will be quite something.
Sam Banks Pavilion
 By Keith Budge, Headmaster, Bedales Schools

Bedales School is one of the UK’s top independent private co-education boarding schools. Bedales comprises three schools situated in Steep, near Petersfield, Hampshire: Dunannie (ages 3–8), Dunhurst (ages 8–13) and Bedales itself (ages 13–18). Established in 1893 Bedales School puts emphasis on the Arts, Sciences, voluntary service, pastoral care, and listening to students’ views. Bedales is acclaimed for its drama, theatre, art and music school. The Headmaster is Keith Budge.

Big day for students

Thursday is big day for student performance, publications and initiative, with the Dunannie Christmas Celebration and the finals of the Youth and Philanthropy Initiative in the evening. At Dunannie, on a historic day in the Press history, audience members willingly dip into their pockets for a copy of the new, jazzy, colourful Hello! Dunannie, which has some splendid jokes (favourite: What does a French cow say? Moo-La-La) and much else to engage us. In the library it is the Reception class which is splendidly to the fore, playing most of the named, nativity parts. To the finals of the Youth and Philanthropy Initiative in the evening, where I am a judge. This is the second year that we have taken part in the YPI and the presentations are strong again and the research process has clearly taken the groups into territory they would not have encountered were it not for the scheme. After due deliberation the white smoke goes up and Bedales head boy and head girl, Oscar and Cecily, announce the winning charity as the Chestnut Tree House, ably presented by Amy L, Becky G, Josie P and Archie G.

By Keith Budge, Headmaster, Bedales Schools


Bedales School is one of the UK’s top independent private co-education boarding schools. Bedales comprises three schools situated in Steep, near Petersfield, Hampshire: Dunannie (ages 3–8), Dunhurst (ages 8–13) and Bedales itself (ages 13–18). Established in 1893 Bedales School puts emphasis on the Arts, Sciences, voluntary service, pastoral care, and listening to students’ views. Bedales is acclaimed for its drama, theatre, art and music school. The Headmaster is Keith Budge.

Badley Weekend invites careful introspection

The imminent Badley Celebration Weekend, invites annual scrutiny of how faithful we are to the values of the school’s founder, John Badley – and indeed, how relevant/achievable the founding principles of the school are. Am talking about this – at Bedales assembly on Wednesday and Dunhurst Jaw on Friday – so that is further cause for careful introspection. Fundamental to Badley’s vision is the concept of continual scrutiny and re-evaluation of our educational purpose – famously, his dictum that a school should be “re-built” every 7 years. Whilst clearly mainly a figure of speech, it is a warning against complacency and a call for regular, honest scrutiny.

By Keith Budge, Headmaster Bedales Schools


Bedales School is one of the UK’s top independent private co-education boarding schools. Bedales comprises three schools situated in Steep, near Petersfield, Hampshire: Dunannie (ages 3–8), Dunhurst (ages 8–13) and Bedales itself (ages 13–18). Established in 1893 Bedales School puts emphasis on the Arts, Sciences, voluntary service, pastoral care, and listening to students’ views. Bedales is acclaimed for its drama, theatre, art and music school. The Headmaster is Keith Budge.

Celebrate the difference

To Frensham Heights on Monday for the Celebrate the Difference conference that Andrew Fisher and I have been co-running for the past 5 years. This time the theme is different kinds of leadership. Distinguishing feature of CTD is that it is a joint student and staff day. Nick Vetch, who founded and chairs the Big Yellow Group, sets us going with a self-deprecatory account of his own mistakes and near misses, followed by a series of key qualities that make for good leadership – courage, integrity, strong communication and self-awareness; then it’s into workshops and, within them, 2s or 3s for small group discussion. At the plenary the focus shifts to ways in which our schools can provide opportunities for student leadership – and whether leadership can be taught. Intriguing for the 17 Bedales students there to see the way that the different values of the 5 different schools show themselves in the views of their students. Next year, it’s with us: a plan is hatched and some cunning wheezes (suggested to me by the students that I drive back) to avoid that sense that you have at so many conferences of too much talking and listening and not enough learning by doing.
 
By Keith Budge, Headmaster, Bedales Schools
 

Bedales School is one of the UK’s top independent private co-education boarding schools. Bedales comprises three schools situated in Steep, near Petersfield, Hampshire: Dunannie (ages 3–8), Dunhurst (ages 8–13) and Bedales itself (ages 13–18). Established in 1893 Bedales School puts emphasis on the Arts, Sciences, voluntary service, pastoral care, and listening to students’ views. Bedales is acclaimed for its drama, theatre, art and music. The Headmaster is Keith Budge.