Here comes the Spring

By Feline Charpentier, 6.2 Houseparent and Teacher of Outdoor Work

Ostara, or the spring equinox, falls this Saturday, and marks the first point of spring in the Northern Hemisphere. It marks the moment when the sun crosses the equator line, and heads north. It is also known as the vernal equinox, ver in latin meaning spring – think verdant, youthful, fresh. Day and night are of equal length, and from then on our days begin to lengthen. All around us nature is coming alive, and there are signs of this life everywhere we look, from the lambs in the fields to the buds on the trees. The daffodils on Emma’s walk are just beginning to show off their glorious egg yolk yellow. The sound of birdsong is hard to miss everywhere in school!

Ostara, from the Germanic goddess Oestre, and the root of the word Oestrogen, the hormone which stimulates ovulation, was how our ancestors marked the spring, and saw the end of winter. It is a time of perfect balance, of finding harmony, between the dark and the light, the inner and outer, between intuition and the rational.

It is a time where embracing male and female energies, regardless of gender, can be full of potential, and give life to new ideas and ways of seeing the world. It is often in the state of harmony, and balance, that true change can occur. It is a time when all those gentle hopes we had at Imbolc might be beginning to come to fruition. When we can truly look forward, not back.

Two of the symbols we still mark this time of year with, the hare and the egg, have their origins at least in part in the ancient festival of Ostara. The goddess Oestre was often depicted as having the head of a hare, a symbol of immortality and rebirth. There are many versions of the story where she changed a bird into a hare to have as her companion. Eggs were thus given and received as gifts, as potent symbols of life and the fertility of the earth. The yolk and the white representing the perfect harmony of life.

Ostara is a wonderful time to literally, and figuratively, plant seeds for the year ahead. Having more time in the day to do all those jobs we wait all winter to begin is so energising, and there is a spring in the step of those you meet on walks. On our sixth form course we have been planning our planting for the year ahead, choosing seeds and imagining the bounty in the autumn.

Spring clean your space, ridding it of the cloak of winter, and face the summer ahead with fresh eyes. Bring buds into your home to see life burst forth, paint eggs, spend the day outdoors enjoying the longer daylight and fresh air. Why not revisit the intentions made at Imbolc, and step forth boldly into the light. Now is the time we may see them bloom. Celebrate the different aspects of your being, the balance that exists, noticing how we all live harmoniously with one another most of the time, even through crisis and hardship. There is so much to look forward to.

Ushering in the spring

By Feline Charpentier, 6.2 Houseparent and Teacher of Outdoor Work

In Living with the Land, our Sixth Form course that launched at the start of this academic year, we talk about the changing of the seasons a lot. About paying attention to the landscape around us, about how the land can influence our own state of mind, and help us be more present. The old calendars which celebrated the earth cycles, marking the four solstices and the four cross quarters, are often good for reminding us of the inevitable change that occurs all around us.

In the traditional calendar we are approaching one of the four fire festivals, a cross quarter moment in the year, known as Imbolc (or St Bride’s, or Groundhog Day, in the US). The other fire festivals are Beltane, Lughnasadh and Samhain. Imbolc this year occurs on the night of 1 February, going into the morning of the 2nd.

Looking out of the window it can seem that all of life is dreary, grey and wet, that there is little to hope for. We are all trapped indoors, and it can feel that spring may never come. And yet, all of life lies dormant beneath the soil. The trees hold the promise of buds, there are snowdrops beginning to flower. It is a matter of weeks before signs of life will begin to show.

Imbolc literally refers to ‘in the belly’, referring originally to lambing season, which would be beginning about now for many farmers, to the fertility of the soil, the imminent arrival of spring and all the life it brings with it. Our ancestors would have spent time reflecting on the year behind them, and planning the planting for the year ahead. They would have seen this time of year as a time to rest, to recuperate, to sleep and store energy for what was to come.

In some way our current confinement is exactly that, a time to rest, and plan for what lies ahead.

Although we all wish things were different and we might even be wishing the time away, there is hope to be found in the small things, in the inevitable turning of the earth towards the spring, in the time we have been gifted to reflect, to recuperate, to make plans, to hope.

Imbolc brings with it the opportunity to reflect on the darkness of winter, to draw breath and take stock, to prepare for the newness of the spring and summer ahead. To plant seeds, both literally and metaphorically, for the future. In our online ODW lessons we are baking, reading, crafting and making, planting seeds, planning what we will grow this year, looking forward to when we are all here again.

So maybe, this Imbolc, why not write your intentions for the year ahead, plant some seeds, bring a few sprigs of hazel inside to see the buds come out, or even make a solar (or St. Brigid’s) cross if you can gather some Rushes outdoors. Find instructions here.